21.47.105.1; 21.48.111; 21.1181; 21.3684

21.47.105.1

21.47.105.1

21.48.111

21.48.111

21.1181

21.1181

21.3684

21.3684

Hanging Offering Vessels: Middle Classic to Low Imperial

The introduction of copper is not the only evidence of foreign contacts with Ephemera.  These hanging offering Vessels are a rare occurrence of Near Eastern elements in the Ephemerean material culture, which is known for its conservatism.   These examples  are thought to be made to resemble Canaanite Amphora and other Near Eastern designs. The location of there find, the northern wall of Temple II, from which one can see the entire Seyathos Valley, was most puzzling.  By chance I ran into an old friend Dr. Fishmore who is a Nautically Archaeologist.  He explained that a ship sailing from Cyprus (the probable origin of copper imports) would first sail north then west hugging the Turkish coast, which was safer than the open sea.  The ship would then turned south to Ephemera, which would mean that the priests or worshipers at the Temple would have first seen the ship approaching from the north.  We may conclude it would seem that these vessels, made to represent pottery associated with sea travel, left as offerings facing north, were a prayer for trade ships to reappear on the horizon.  This theory is made more probable when we note that this type of vessel fades out of use during the Imperial Period, when copper became an almost daily import.

1106

1106

1106

Banquet Ware: Middle Classic

Banquet Ware is a unique type of drinking cup that first appears in the Middle Classic, having three or more copper bands held fast to the clay form with a metal ring- which by the close of the Middle Classic developed a ‘buckel’- holding the bands in place.  These cups where named Banquet Ware by Dr. David Zimmerman because they were first found at sites associated with out door ritual feasting. Though examples have be found inside temple sites (like this example), and even with in huts along the Seyathos Valley. What there exact function was we cannot say but they were very popular during the Middle Classic to Late Classic until the Chalice forms of the Imperial replaced them.  This example was found in one of the many out door feasting sites around Ephemera.

16773

16773

16773

Early Classic Offering Vessel:

Clay vessels, made to resemble there reed counter parts, with an attached rush handle – the the favored offering vessel of the Seyathos Culture – where used in the offering of a variety of herbs, presumably to the deceased or the gods. During the Early Classic Period we find the same ceramic form but with handles made of copper.

This example of an Early Classic offering vessel shows clearly how the use of metal was used to resemble its rush, or reed counterpart.